Our City in the Sand

One-off city
lights burnt out over the
capital.
Replacements long
impractical renovate
our most
magical impressions,
founded on the coattails of a metropolis we’d
have faulted for its flaws,
but applauded for
its feats.

And I feel the feet of wandering tourists and
school kids and
purists,

all wondering where
it went downhill;

young families and
fermented goodwill raising gangsters
and a generation filled to
the brim with
disappointment.

It’s that disjointed reality sitting on a park bench, drinking Johnny Walker in broad daylight, mumbling how white privelege has run its course.

Playing homelessness for
sport,
lifetime wasting away just to
have
his day in court,
his mother’s keepsake so long adorned,
born ward of the state and choices no one forced
the man to make;

a perfect cake to own and
digest, too.

This is the story of you and I; an inevitable equality that failed to find the heart of its policy
and following unwritten roads,

failed to see
it through.

We break,
rebound
awaken to
rays of light in
the distance not taken-

horizons of hope that may
lead us to the most desolate of places
but we keep on chasing mementos

to lockets
of dust,

futures where the
harshest of
our fires caught.

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6 thoughts on “Our City in the Sand

  1. Sometimes I wonder what really is the “white privilege”. Do you have to satisfy both terms of the phrase to really fit in?

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    1. Probably. I find the term silly myself. Like the words “millenial” and “entitled”. Words are thrown around a lot.

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      1. True that. But, they do make you question all the whys. Why are they thrown out a lot? What history fuels the emotions that goes into the words? What makes them okay to be used in some situations in some historical contexts, but in others. Although, people do tend to overuse it and obliterate and make light of everything that has been put into it. I mean just because if you don’t get your way, you can’t go around using terms such as these.

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